Albert's story

Sadly, there are many orphaned children living in run-down rondavels with no parents or relatives to care for them. They scavenge for food. The bush is their bathroom. Termites eat away at their shelters. And, until recently, they have been shunned by their neighbors because their parents "died of AIDS," a badge of shame in a culture that does not understand.


Awareness of this situation has grown rapidly in recent years to such a degree that it has spawned a whole new acronym in the ZMP lexicon: CHH, Child-Headed Household. But things are changing. God is at work. 


Albert, a teenaged orphan, had buried both parents and all his siblings, and had been living alone for several years. There were plenty of neighbors around, but Albert was living exactly as described above – ashamed and unworthy of attention – until HCOC showed up.


Suffice it to say that, because HCOC people thought Albert was worth caring for, neighbors began to see his worth. The village elder showed up and saw his worth. That lent still further credibility to the worth of this young man.


In literally a few short days, a pit had been dug for a new toilet, a new doorframe had been installed on his rondavel, the walls had been plastered with new cement inside and out, and a new thatched roof was in place. Two window frames had been installed for lighting and ventilation. And a new floor was in progress. Much of the labor was supplied by people of the village who worked right alongside HCOC workers, and right alongside Albert whose badge of shame had been replaced by a stamp of approval. 


Things are changing. God is at work, changing the way people see others, opening new windows of the soul, bringing light where there is darkness. This is happening throughout the wards where HCOC is at work. Communities are getting involved and becoming a part of the solution.


And now Albert even has a job, helping out at the HCOC poultry project. For more on the poultry project, click here


gaylord's story

"I lost my father and mother when I was still a primary school student. Had it not been for HCOC my life could have been in shambles. I was about to drop out from school, due to financial challenges, when HCOC came to my rescue in 2008. This organization took care of my welfare and I managed to live a normal life. HCOC supported me from that time and they are still assisting me in whatever ways they can. My special thanks also go to ZMP for taking care of my welfare during my primary and secondary education."


Because of HCOC's assistance, and his own hard work, Gaylord is now attending the University of Zimbabwe. His costs are partially sponsored by a Rotarian, a connection made through HCOC, and by Renewed Hope Charitable Foundation. Between semesters he lives in Murewa with his aunt who, due to her age and health, is gradually becoming dependent on him. 


While continuing his education, Gaylord is giving back to HCOC by serving as a student on attachment. He's learning the accounting function, which will help assure his future, but at the same time he is helping other orphans and vulnerable children receive the same support he did.


A message from Gaylord, July 2016: "On behalf of all the HCOC beneficiaries, allow me to express our sincere gratitude for everything you have done. I understand it's not because you have abundant resources, but out of sacrifices and the love you have for us as the disadvantaged youn generation of the world. I am no longer a victim of the fear of heights. Who knew an orphan could have such a privilege to be exposed to the world of professionals – God bless you again for that. Personally, I'm no longer the same. There was a complete transformation of my life since the intervention of your works in my life. I'm profoundly honored and exceedingly humbled. Of course, I will face more challenges, but I boast to be a man enough to stand up to the challenges I will face in the future."



Godknows' story

"I am Godknows, a young man aged twenty-three who has been a beneficiary of HCOC since its establishment in 2001. Because of HCOC, I managed to make it through all my lower educational levels from primary  up to advanced. The crossing of this bridge and eventual achievement of what I may term good results wasn't an easy task for me or HCOC, since we had to walk through thick and thin together. Both  my parents passed away in 2001 when I was still at a tender age, eight years old. My 80-year-old grandmother started looking after me, and that is the same year I became an HCOC beneficiary. HCOC assisted me with stationery, school fees, food and clothing, not forgetting the love and compassion for the vulnerable children."


God knows is currently an undergraduate at Midlands State University in Gweru where he is studying for his Bachelor of Sciences  in Media and Society Studies. He continues to be helped through donors connected  to HCOC.


A message from Godknows, July 2016:  "I was a nobody, but because of your concern, care, love and compassion to assist me socially, psychologically and intellectually, you have made me somebody. Living a life where your biological parents are both dead is something which is unbearable and painful to reflect back on it; sometimes it demotivates and paints a life of hopelessness when you do not have someone to lean on or who will care for your welfare as a parent would. I want to appreciate your unconditional love sometimes going through thick and thin  to raise me this far. The fact that I have acquired knowledge through education up to the tertiary level; I am now a recognizable citizen who can also be influential in society a few years to come. As important, I have derived the steadfast love that parents can give to kids. Thank you very much HCOC, Zimbabwe Mission Partnership, Rotary International and Renewed Hope Charitable Foundation, for covering that gap and loving me." 



mupfupi's story

"In October 2004, both of my parents were involved in a car accident on their way home and they passed away. So, I moved to Murewa where my grandmother had to look after me. In 2005, I became a beneficiary of HCOC for school fees, stationery, food and uniforms. My grandmother was age 77 and self-employed, producing very little for survival through peasant farming. Without HCOC it was like trying to destroy a mountain with a teaspoon because, as an orphan in a poor family, there is no joy at all. HCOC made me smile again. I strived to work hard from my primary level up to advanced level and did well in these levels of education, and have now moved to the next level, tertiary education."


Mupfupi is at Binder University of Science Education. He also desires to give back to orphans and vulnerable children. One of the first things he achieved along with some fellow students at university was to launch a Rotaract Club of Binder University for helping orphans, vulnerable children and those disadvantaged. The club focuses on ways to empower young men and women between 18 and 30 years of age, so they can offer physical, social and financial help to all those in need in their communities.